Shepparton: Buddhist Meditation, August 2018

The Buddhist Association of the Goulburn Valley will conduct one Meditation Session on Saturday, 18 August 2018 at the Senior Citizens Centre, Welsford Street, at 10:00 am.


Why Meditation?

The mind is very wild. The human experience is full of unpredictability and paradox, joys and sorrows, successes and failures. We can’t escape any of these experiences in the vast terrain of our existence. It is part of what makes life grand—and it is also why our minds take us on such a crazy ride. If we can train ourselves through meditation to be more open and more accepting toward the wild arc of our experience, if we can lean into the difficulties of life and the ride of our minds, we can become more settled and relaxed amid whatever life brings us.

Meditation teaches us how to relate to life directly, so we can truly experience the present moment, free from conceptual overlay.

There are numerous ways to work with the mind. One of the most effective is through the tool of sitting meditation. Sitting meditation opens us to each and every moment of our life. Each moment is totally unique and unknown. Our mental world is seemingly predictable and graspable. We believe that thinking through all the events and to-dos of our life will provide us with ground and security. But it’s all a fantasy, and this very moment, free of conceptual overlay, is completely unique. It is absolutely unknown. We’ve never experienced this very moment before, and the next moment will not be the same as the one we are in now. Meditation teaches us how to relate to life directly, so we can truly experience the present moment, free from conceptual overlay.

We do not meditate in order to be comfortable. In other words, we don’t meditate in order to always, all the time, feel good. I imagine shockwaves are passing through you as you read this, because so many people come to meditation to simply “feel better.” However, the purpose of meditation is not to feel bad, you’ll be glad to know. Rather, meditation gives us the opportunity to have an open, compassionate attentiveness to whatever is going on. The meditative space is like the big sky — spacious, vast enough to accommodate anything that arises.

In meditation, our thoughts and emotions can become like clouds that dwell and pass away. Good and comfortable, pleasing and difficult and painful—all of this comes and goes. So the essence of meditation is training in something that is quite radical and definitely not the habitual pattern of the species: and that is to stay with ourselves no matter what is happening, without putting labels of good and bad, right and wrong, pure and impure, on top of our experience.

Meditation gives us the opportunity to have an open, compassionate attentiveness to whatever is going on. The meditative space is like the big sky— spacious, vast enough to accommodate anything that arises.

If meditation was just about feeling good (and I think all of us secretly hope that is what it’s about), we would often feel like we must be doing it wrong. Because at times, meditation can be such a difficult experience. A very common experience of the meditator, in a typical day or on a typical retreat, is the experience of boredom, restlessness, a hurting back, pain in the knees — even the mind might be hurting — so many “not feeling good” experiences. Instead, meditation is about a compassionate openness and the ability to be with oneself and one’s situation through all kinds of experiences. In meditation, you’re open to whatever life presents you with. It’s about touching the earth and coming back to being right here. While some kinds of meditation are more about achieving special states and somehow transcending or rising above the difficulties of life, the kind of meditation that I’ve trained in and that I am talking about here is about awakening fully to our life. It’s about opening the heart and mind to the difficulties and the joys of life—just as it is. And the fruits of this kind of meditation are boundless.

Buddhist Meditation in Shepparton

The Buddhist Association of the Goulburn Valley will conduct one Meditation Session on Saturday 18th of August 2018 at the Senior Citizens Centre, Welsford Street, at 10:00 am. The Buddhist Association of the Goulburn Valley kinidly invites you to attend this meditation session conducted in English by Venerable Phra Ronrawee Thero. Venerable Phra Ronrawee Thero is the chief Buddhist Monk of the Dhammakaya Temple of Melbourne and the director of the Dhammakaya Society of Victoria Inc.

Event Details

Program: Meditation led by Venerable Phra Ronrawee Thero
Date: Saturday 18 August 2018
Location: Senior Citizens Centre, 132 Welsford St, Shepparton (adjacent Monash Park)
Time: 10-11am
Cost: Free
More Information: Mr Atukorala, 5831 2395
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